We’ve come so far in the few short years since we launched the Brain Donor Project—and we’re passionate about sharing our message that there is a critical need for brain donation to even more people.

We’re so grateful for the 15,000+ people who have already pre-registered their brains to be donated to neuroscience research. Their generous and selfless gifts help to further the progression of scientific research and breakthroughs, and also could have an impact on their own families.

But we need to spread the word about the need for brain donation, and dispel myths and fears people might have. Science needs more brains, from all kinds of people.

Help us launch this
annual observance!

Here are ways you can help:

Follow & Share

Follow, like, comment and share our social media posts – especially as we promote National Brain Donation Awareness Day. This will help us spread the word to others who may not yet know about brain donation, the Brain Donor Project, or the inaugural Brain Donation Awareness Day.

Use Our Resources

If you’re an organization or individual who wants to show your support, find our social media toolkit repository here with logos and sample posts to use on your own channels. Be sure to tag us and use #braindonationawarenessday in your posts as you share them!

Why May 7th?

You might know that The Brain Donor Project was inspired by one man’s gift of brain donation. After his diagnosis of Lewy Bodies Dementia, Gene Armentrout, father of BDP founder Tish Hevel, had a wish that his brain might help someone else. He donated his brain with the goal of furthering science, hoping that someday it might keep another person from suffering from the debilitating effects of brain disease.

May 7th is Gene’s birthday, the perfect date to celebrate and honor Gene’s legacy and raise awareness of the critical need for brain donation. Learn more about The Brain Behind the Brain Donor Project.

Thank you for spreading the word about the need for donated human brains. The need has never been more urgent – for all kinds of brains, from all kinds of people. Neuroscientists require the tissue to better understand how the brain works, and to make progress toward preventing, diagnosing, treating and curing brain diseases. And that can have a lasting impact for future generations – your family and others – to come.